Do you know what the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World are?

Forget what you've been told because the original 7 Wonders might not be what you thought they were. 

WHY DO WE HAVE FOR THE 7 WONDERS OF THE WORLD NOW?

WHY DO WE HAVE FOR THE 7 WONDERS OF THE WORLD NOW?

Before answering this Google-search worthy question, we need to know what qualifies something as a Wonder of the World. Now, they must be central pieces in human history, marking a certain period or change in the times. Well, that doesn't help us very much because lat leaves us with so many options.

But don't be nervous, we're sure the answer has been in your head this whole time:

  • Chichen Itza, Yucatán, Mexico
  • The Colosseum, Rome, Italy
  • The Christ the Redeemer Statue, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • The Great Wall of China, China
  • Machu Picchu, Cuzco, Peru
  • Petra, Jordan
  • The Taj Mahal, Agra, India

However, these were not the first on the list. This "international competition" goes way back to the Dutch painter Maerten van Heemskerck (1498 - 1574)m who made a selection of seven architectural and sculptural works. Van Heemskerck chose the number sevendue to its Hellenistic reputation as the perfect number. Of these only one remains while the others six are destroyed.

So, out of this came the 7 Wonders contests we know today. But these original seven are worthy of your attention. Just remember, there is only one left standing.

THE 7 WONDERS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD

THE LIGHTHOUSE OF ALEXANDRIA

It was built in the 3rd century B.C.E. by Stratotrato de Cnido. Located on the island of Pharos, in the bay of Alexandria, Egypt, it's purpose was to orientate the navigators of the ships. The lighthouse was powered by means of a bonfire that burned day and night in its interior. This light was then directed by a series of mirrors and lenses which projected more than 50 kilometers off the coast. It is a masterpiece from a time when there are few remnants. After 1323 C.E. the building was no longer usable due to earthquake damages, and was left to crumble. 

by Rebecca Herr